Kuwait’s election: MNTV, not “block vote” (and measuring variation in “blockness”)

It has been widely reported that in Kuwait’s election, “radicals” gained significantly and one “westernized” candidate narrowly missed becoming the first woman elected to the assembly. Less reported is what the electoral system is. If it is the same as it was in 2003, the 50 seats are allocated in 25 districts by MNTV. [UPDATE: […]

Lebanon’s New PR Electoral System: Undermining Proportional Outcomes in a Proportional Representation Electoral System

This is a guest post by Amal Hamdan In May 2018, parliamentary elections are scheduled to be held in Lebanon using a PR electoral system for the first time. The last parliamentary elections in Lebanon were held in June 2009. Since then, parliament has extended its own term twice. After years of deadlock over electoral […]

How not to federalise

Since his election in 2015, Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte has done little that supporters of liberal democracy should admire. His program of extrajudicial killings and contemptuous attitude to the judicial institutions of the Philippines demonstrates that he is in many ways a dangerous figure for the country. However, it’s true that a stopped clock is right twice a […]

Jordan’s new electoral system – the more things change…

By JD Mussel and Henry Schlechta Jordan held a parliamentary election last month, for the first time under a proportional party-list system. This reform, in line with many previous proposals, replaces the earlier Single Non-Transferable Vote or (mechanically FPTP) pseudo-SNTV (it’s not clear which one was actually used last time around) which at the last election […]

District magnitude and reelection in Iran (and what is a mixed-member system)

A recent entry at the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog by Paasha Mahdavi (Georgetown) is a summary of the author’s really fascinating research on Iranian MP reelection rates. Mahdavi finds that MPs from more resource-rich regions are more able to secure reelection because they get credit from targeted spending in their districts. Reelection rates in […]

Thailand political reforms (yes, again)

The current Thai political reform process, underway since the military coup of 2014, is churning out some significant changes. Already, decisions appear to have been made to move to mixed-member proportional (MMP), with the list-tier seats allocated via open party lists. Thailand in the past has used mixed-member majoritarian (MMM or “parallel”). It has used […]

Choosing executive format in Sri Lanka and Mauritius

comments are now open As previously mentioned on this blog, Sri Lanka recently elected Maithripala Sirisena as president. Among his campaign promises was a pledge to initiate a series of constitutional reforms, including to the judiciary, parliament’s electoral system, as well as the reform of his own post, the executive presidency. Though his manifesto is a little vague[1], it seems […]

Modifications to Thai electoral system

Thailand’s mixed-member majoritarian electoral system is being modified–again. According to the Thai paper, The Nation, the number of party lists seats is being increased from 100 to 125, and the multi-seat districts in the nominal tier are being replaced by all single-seat districts. This would make the system more similar once again to the one […]

Jordanian SNTV (or is it not SNTV?)

Frequent commenter Bancki noted the following about the Jordanian election of this past week: When you think you’ve seen it all, Jordan invented a new hybrid electoral system: SNTV with virtual sub-districts: on the one hand, every voter has only one vote for one candidate in his multi-member-district (SNTV), but on the other hand, the […]

Lebanon’s election

Lebanon’s parliamentary election is today. BBC: Under Lebanon’s power-sharing political system, seats in the 128-member parliament are split equally between Christians and Muslims, with further sub-divisions for various sects. Indeed, each of 128 seats is set aside for a specific “confessional” group, in a fixed distribution, and the balance of confessional seats in any given […]