Super Tuesday guide

I made myself a guide to the states (not all of them) voting today. It includes the FiveThirtyEight polling aggregate and the most recent individual polls (which will have been included in the aggregate as well). It also has the poll closing times.

Sanders Biden Bloomberg Warren others Polls close (PST)
Alabama 5:00
538 18.4 40.2 15.9 10.9 14.6
Swayable Mar 1-2 20 42 20 10 8
Data for Progress Feb 27-Mar 2 22 47 18 12 1
Arkansas 5:30
538 18.1 27.5 21 12.5 20.9
Swayable Mar 1-2 17 28 25 10 20
Data for Progress Feb 27-Mar 2 23 36 22 15 4
Hendrix Coll. Feb 6-7 16 19 20 9 36
Colorado 6:00
538 26.8 18.2 15.8 16.3 22.9
Swayable Mar 1-2 29 20 19 12 20
Data for Progress Feb 27-Mar 2 32 18 16 21 13
Elucd Feb 26-Mar 1 34 10 9 14 33
Magellan Strategies Feb 24-25 27 11 11 15 36
Data for Progress Feb 23-25 34 10 14 20 22
Massachusetts 5:00
538 26.8 18.2 15.8 16.3 22.9
Swayable Mar 1-2 27 17 18 15 23
Data for Progress Feb 27-Mar 2 26 26 15 28 5
Suffolk Feb 26-29 24 11 13 22 30
Minnesota 6:00
538 26.2 18 12 14 29.8
Swayable Mar 1-2 27 20 14 8 31
Data for Progress Feb 27-Mar 2 32 27 16 21 4
North Carolina 4:30
538 22.1 34.5 14.4 11.3 17.7
Swayable Mar 1-2 23 36 18 10 13
Data for Progress Feb 27-Mar 2 27 36 18 14 5
Elucd Feb 26-Mar 1 26 25 15 12 22
High Point Univ Feb 21-28 28 14 20 12 26
Tennessee 5:00
538 24.7 29 15.7 12.3 18.3
Swayable Mar 1-2 27 28 17 9 19
Data for Progress Feb 27-Mar 2 27 34 20 15 4
Oklahoma 5:00
538 30.6 22.1 13.7 13.6 20
Swayable Mar 1-2 26 38 11 13 12
Data for Progress Feb 27-Mar 2 28 35 19 16 2
Sooner Feb 17-21 13 21 20 9 37
Texas 5:00
538 28.2 25.5 16.5 13.3 16.5
Swayable Mar 1-2 28 27 20 12 13
Data for Progress Feb 27-Mar 2 28 30 20 15 7
AtlasIntel Feb 24-Mar 2 35 25 16 9 15
Emerson Coll Feb 29-Mar 1 31 26 16 14 13
Elucd 31 20 14 13 22
Note: some parts of Texas are in MST, where polls close at 6:00
California 8:00
538 31.2 21.7 14.7 14.9 17.5
Swayable Mar 1-2 29 21 19 10 21
Data for Progress Feb 27-Mar 2 32 25 17 16 10
AtlasIntel Feb 24-Mar 2 34 26 15 15 10
Point Blank Feb 29-Mar 1 34 22 10 14 20
Emerson Coll. Feb 29-Mar 1 38 21 11 16 14

I inadvertently left Virginia off the original. Here it is:

Virginia 4:00
538 21 39 14.6 12.3 13.1
Swayable Mar 1-2 20 36 20 11 13
Data for Progress Feb 27-Mar 2 24 39 18 17 2
AtlasIntel Feb 24-Mar 2 28 42 11 10 9
Change Res. Mar 1-2 25 45 10 13 7
Chris. Newport U Feb 3-24 17 22 13 8 40

 

6 thoughts on “Super Tuesday guide

  1. I am sure the other proud Oceanians here will join me in denouncing the US media for mosreporting that Bloomberg did not win anywhere. He triumphed in American Samoa’s caucuses, taking 4 delegates to Tulsi Gabbard’s 1.

  2. I will add a post because of the COVID-19 virus pandemic. Can this be made into a new Fruits and Votes post? Is there anything in the political science literature about any history of a democratic country delaying elections? The alternative is to do all voting by mail. I heard because of war, natural disaster, and insurgency. I am sure that it is easier with parliamentary democracies without fixed terms to delay elections, but what about Presidential countries with fixed terms?

    • The US did not delay elections for the Civil War, WW1, the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic, or WWII. Australia does not cancel or postpone elections either. It’s not a parliamentary thing, it depends on the constitutional provisions in each country. Sweden has a particularly elaborate set of provisions for times of war and national emergency.

      The US constitution does not provide for elections to be cancelled or postponed. I don’t think it’s impossible to imagine there will be an unconstitutional attempt to cancel or postpone the 2020 US elections.

      • There is one set of elections that can be “cancelled.” In theory one or more states could simply assign their Electors rather than have them voted in. They would still need to hold Congressional, and presumably and state elections.

      • Mark

        That’s constitutionally feasible, except that the elections for the house of representatives, the senate and state offices would still have to happen.

        The true motivation of holding a popular election for congress, but not the electoral college, would be fairly blatant. That would take the US into a repeat of the crisis of 1800. The Federalist Party’s attempt to steal the presidency in that year did not work out terribly well for the longterm electoral health of that party. 1800 also led to the XII Amendment which replaced the 1787 version of the electoral college with the Jeffersonian version.

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