There once was a grove

once_a_grove.jpg

Soon it will all be chips, but not the kind for guacamole.
chipper-ready.jpg

For background on how we got to this point, see this year’s Sukkot planting.

I am often asked what I will do with the land.

If I had the resources, maybe wine grapes, or olive trees. Both were once common in these parts, before cheap water and protected markets led to the “green gold” boom (and the fruit of the vine is making a notable comeback, even very nearby). Both crops are much more adaptable to this climate, for sure. But I do not have the resources. So, for now, think of it as a (very) late start to shmitah.

Or maybe I should plant pinyon pine trees. Pine nuts are twenty dollars a pound at a local market.

2 thoughts on “There once was a grove

  1. Good question, Mark. I don’t know, but I am intrigued by this:

    Market potential. Despite $100 million in annual sales in the U.S., the market for pine nuts and pine nut products is underdeveloped (U.S. Trade Quick-Reference Tables: December 2003). Pine nuts are considered a specialty product and are primarily available through specialized distributors such as health food / ethnic food stores and catalogues, as well as an ingredient in oriental / Mediterranean dishes such as pesto. Pine nut oil has limited availability as a gourmet product or food supplement from a number of on-line stores. Other products, such as pine nut chocolate / crunch bars, pine nut meal, milk and cream are virtually unknown. Market growth and introduction of new products is constrained by the limited supply of pine nuts, consumers’ unfamiliarity with these products, and their high cost.

    Supply dependent market. World pine nut production falls far short of demand. […]

    Source: Sharashkin L. and Gold M. 2004. Pine nuts: species, products, markets, and potential for U.S. production. In: Northern Nut Growers Association 95th Annual Report. Proceeding for the 95th annual meeting,
    Columbia, Missouri, August 16-19, 2004.

    Labor costs? High, no doubt. But water costs? A whole lot lower than for avos!

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